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and then west of the rocky mountains to california. it didn't include california because california, as you know, is already a state. it had to do with the future of slavery and the future of southern power in the nation. now they demand that what they saw to take their property including slave property. in the famous and infamous dr. scott decision the united states supreme court affirmed the stuff and constitutional review. nobody, the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november. members of congress put forth a various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all in some duraid dealt with the divisions of the territories. most often there was a proposal to not extend. this would be on with the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. i'm going to get to my main topic life lincoln rejected all. i am going to talk about three different men tonight. one of them, all of you know his income abraham lincoln and here's what he was and who he did. the other two. the great kentucky statesman and william henry
was the closest of all the american presidents. the reagans had first met prince charles was in california while serving with the real navy in the early 1970s. they had an equally strong relationship with the queen and prince philip, as well as her sister, princess margaret, the queen mother, and her cousin, princess alexandra. they kept an extensive personal correspondence that i was given permission to read at the presidential library out in california, the reagan library. the letters tell a story of infection and thoughtfulness on both sides, over more than three decades. correspondence that continues to this day with nancy reagan. in june of 1982, when the reagans were in europe for summit meetings, the queen invited them to stay at windsor castle. which was the first such personal invitation for an american presidential couple. not only did she arrange such a dedicated telephone line, but she had the first shower installed in the more than 900-year-old castle, because she was told that is what the family needed. it was a family dinner on the first night, and the following morning from the q
to be worse than the private markets. in contrast in a speech in california in may, and it romney's said "the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time
california where he had moved and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to do and the man has these wonderful people the adopted three children who the parents were killed and one of them grew up on a pilot and this nurse goes into bob's room and comes to the wall and says why don't you have a dnr it means do not resuscitate. in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, his nurse, his doctor come all the people that saw the nurse do this and her other actions were just appalled by this. warren buffett didn't know of this. on the other hand what does he say about his company? so long as my managers make their numbers, i know the business they see fit and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on where we don't have balancing and we are so focused on profits you can have a company go and say please die. host could you talk in your book about these industries that have been deregulated and people think about regulation in terms of a democrat versus republican issue but or more of the problems created because of democrats or republicans or is this not a party related? >>
is the great plains. west of the rocky mountains to california. it didn't include california because california was already a state. the question was critical because it had to do with the future of slavery and the future of southern power in the nation. now, they have demanded what they consider their constitutional right as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, there was an infamous decision and the united states supreme court confirmed the constitutional review. republicans, in contrast, never. the republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the divisions of territories. most often there was a proposal tuesday extended west beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this preface, i'm going to get to my main point. when lincoln rejected all compromise with
that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government puts half a billion into one of its choice? excellent question. i wrote this book because were not just spending half a billion. we are spending $12 billion year-to-date electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that's about six elion and tax breaks and 6 billion in direct expenditures. we are pursuing a vision of green jobs that makes no sense and has low income americans. we brainwash our children to think green is good and think uncritically about green products and green jobs. yet we can't even define what a green job aids. let's start with green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs is calculated, namely energy from renewable sources, energy effici
but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its recent passage and fiscal affect on the federal government. this is just over an hour. it's a pleasure to be here. thanks to you at st. peter's university hospital for the opportunity to be here today. the topic today's health care reform. it's based on the book and the principal author called the battle for health care obama as reform for america's future is a nonpartisan analysis of health care reform and we are headed. i appro
, california and eventually goes to his home, which they have a right to do and the meanings are these wonderful people who adopted three children were their parents were killed in marvelous human beans. the nurse goes into bob sura and points to the blonde says i'd share the tnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. party of medics keeping you alive when you have a medical emergency? is that asking him to die? is nurse, his doctor, all the people to solve the nurse to this under other actions were just appalled by this. well, warren buffett did know about this and wouldn't approve in the race. on the other hand, what does mr. buffett said so long as my managers the numbers as they see fit. it's indicative of the callousness going on, where we don't have that one or so focus on profit you could have a company go and say please die. >> host: but when we talked in your book about some of these industries being deregulated and certain the presidential campaign they talk about regulation in terms of democrats versus republican issues. but for more of these flaws, more of the problems cr
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
. keep them scared, these undocumented people. someone came from california and said, are you going to let him do that? they said, you're from california? this is arizona. he said, i am from arizona. they said, well, it doesn't matter. you can't do it here. he said, actually, he didn't say it, but a woman who said it. it's always a woman who says something and men who take the credit for it. a little woman to the side said, kicked him in the shins say it's not. chavez said that. [laughter] they began to organize. he began to go camp to camp, town to town says you don't recall why you have a great constitution. it was the workers. it was the laborers. it was the mexican-americans who demanded one thing, the recall, the power to recall corrupt official, and we didn't get into the constitution as what hunt put back in the constitution, and it's the one thing you gifted the state to use it. chavez began an amazing recall campaign, but he began a fast for love. i don't need to liberate them, but liberate the hearts of people who hate. i need to liberate the hearts of people who don't rec
'm a senior fellow, in california in the early '90s on this topic. they were doing a series of events for high school teachers, and that's how it got started. and then when i decided to put them together in a book, i went over them, expanded them and really developed the argument in a way that it deserves to be stated. c-span: where's the claremont institute, and what does it do? >> guest: they're--well, they're a think tank--claremont, california, and they're devoted to the idea of restoring the principles of the declaration of independence in american life. many of the people associated with the institute are former students of harry jaffa, who was, for many years, a professor out there in the claremont mckenna college and graduate school. c-span: how big is it? how many people belong to it? >> guest: well, it's not like--it's not quite as big as aei, but it's one of the major conservative--sort of second-tier conservative think tanks in america. c-span: and where is claremont, california? what's it near? >> guest: well, it's about 30 miles east of la. c-span: in the beginning of your book u
shading herself into bob manning's life in california where he moved, and eventually he goes to his home, which they have a investigate to do to inspect. and the mannings are these wonderful people who accommodated three children from a relative where the parents were killed, and marvelous human beings. one of the sons grew up to become an airline pilot. and the nurse goes into bob's room and points to the wall and says, why don't you have a dnr. that means do not resuscitate. why how having the medics try to keep you alive when you have an a medical emergency. in effect, asking him to die. and bob's wife, bob, his nurse, his doctor, all the people who saw the nurse do this and her other actions, were just appalled by this. well, you know, warren buffett didn't know about dismiss wouldn't approve of it. on the other hand, what does he say about his company? so long as my managers make their numbers, i let them run the businesses as they see fit. and it's indicative of the callousness going on where we don't have intestinal so focused on profits you can have a company go and say, please d
into bob manning slides in california where he moved, and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to due to inspect. and the manning's are these wonderful people who, they adopted three children from the relative whose parents were killed, and marvelous human beings. this nurse goes into bob's room and points to the wall and system why don't you have a dnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. why are you having medics tried to keep you likely have one of your of emergencies which have us all the time, in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, bob, his nurse, his doctor, all the people who saw the nurse do this and/or other actions were just appalled by this. will, well, you know, warren buffett didn't know about this and wouldn't approve of italy's. but understand what does mr. buffett said about his company's? so long as my managers make their numbers, i let them run the bases that they see fit. and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on when we don't have balance and we are so focused on profit that we literally cannot a company go and say, please die. >> host: but
, asking to be incorporated into the union. i think the hope was akin to a california had done, establish sovereign state and have u.s. government take it as a done deed and skip territorial status. they send one petitioned asking to be admitted to territory and covered the implications of territorial rule inside a second petition asking for admittance to this day. i was ultimately is wary admitting for a number of reasons, including the small population. so ultimately it ends up in the utah territory. >> next question. over here with the mike, please. thank you. >> i am wondering -- i just finished reading the book this morning. it's brilliant. i wonder if you could tell us a little bit more about the united order and in particular there is some comments at some point in the boat on brigham young's attitude with respect to capitalism. could you expand on that further? >> scheuer. well, he's a little hard to pin down on capitalism mainly because his foremost concern is not allowing outside capitalists to have too much power over developments in utah. he's very much much in favor of promot
with. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i have listened to the senator from ohio, and i really want to be heard because he's talking about the fiscal cliff and how upset he is at the thought that the wealthiest people in america might go back to the tack rates we had under bill clinton when we had the greatest prosperity, we had 23 million new jobs, and we balanced the budget to the point where we even had a surplus. and my friend comes down here and he's complaining that the proposal on the table would give 98% of the people a tax cut, and he's upset that 2% of the people might have to go back to the rates under bill clinton. well, i just want to say something. we just had an election. we had a big election. we had a tough election. we had an expensive election. and one of the major parts of that election revolved around what do we do about the deficits, what do we do about economic growth, what do we do about spending, and we discussed it in the senate races, we discussed it in the house races, and of course president ob
as the great plains, the rocky mountains and then west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california has you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed this southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow moral -- no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territories. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of a dividing line western beyond the louisiana purchase all
and southern california and arizona and north carolina are informed in the post-world war two period by this historic shift in population and political influence and it is pogo from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefron
-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
aren't we getting together? >> that is a great idea. >> if you change california i could tell you sacramento is broke and. please but against every single tax. [applause] >> this crowd does not need to be reminded. >> the ballot is very long. vote against every single one. it's like giving her a went to a junkie. >> herald-tribune is for sale. how do we by media? >> bella also like to comment on the public-school said. liberals don't favor that but they send their kids to the white private school it does not matter to them but who is by teeing the vouchers to the and mail and al gore was asked in the debate in harlem and he was running for president as he was beholden to the teachers' unions a black reporter said if you are so big on the public schools then why do your kids go to private schools? he got angry and said don't bring my children and to this. way to. [laughter] hold on. not so fast. is great to start another fox news but why is that the only game in town? they have 10 times the ratings of cnn but it has not occurred two msnbc they are getting higher ratings of wonder i
cummings for bringing this issue along with you. amtrak is extremely important to california. we have three of the top five busiest corridors in our california area. two of them are supported totally by the state. i see that there are some cuts coming through and i'm going to be looking at that very closely because it has a 2.8 million ridership. our state support services program as has been stated, vitality must be supported for the state-supported services program. incentivizing the states to work with passenger rail service to complement the national network. is important to all states, especially california, we are a donor states because gives more options to commuters and many intercity travelers while reducing pollution. california's been at the forefront of reduction of pollution and cars and several other areas and we continue to look for ways to be able to get people out of cars and into public transportation. the transportation commission are voicing their opinions -- talk to the transportation secretary brian kelly and rail to finish billbrad beyond keon how they view amtrak's w
incredibly well here. in california, that is not an issue. it is not a tradition there. but if they can look and say, okay, in order to be a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberative and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say, all right, we don't have to have town meetings and all apples. we can have oranges. the people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibilities why is it locally. in some ways, that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> vermont became a state in 1791 and since that time, it has become the largest producer of maple syrup in the united states and one of the blur discredit producers in the country. it is also rich in history and literary culture. over the course of her recent visit with the help of our cable partner, comcast, booktv brings you many interviews with local authors. you can watch a few of those now. >> here we go. i am paul carnahan. this is margarete strawn. we are in the vermont history center. we have a photo albu
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and sou
of california in 1962. nixon remembered that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was a fellow named george romney. who's son mitt has been in the news lately. mitt's day complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seemed to think he could run it any way saw he fit. there was talk that ray may have used fannie mae postage or letter head to raise money for the democratic candidates. and the white house was gets complaints from the republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related to foreclosures. all the fees. within nine months nixon fired him as fannie mae without giving any public explanation. he resisted. he full min nate to the press that nixon was turning fannie mae in to a patronage put pudding. he tried to get a restraining order from the federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. ray kept showing up for work anyway. at one point, the lights went out and the phone lines went dead. some people interpreted this as a subtle message f
of california in 1962. nixon still remember that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing sector was a fellow named george romney whose son mitt romney has been in the news lately. his dad complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seem to think he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might use fannie mae postage or letterhead to raise money for democratic candidates. the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related foreclosures, all those fees. well, within nine months of taking office, nixon fired ray lapin as president of fannie mae without giving any public explanation. ray lapin resisted. he fulminated to the press nixon western fannie mae into what he called a patronage putting. try to try to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. but ray kept showing up for work anyway. [laughter] at one point the lights went out at fannie mae's offices
as long as pat brown was governor, clark kerr would read as university of california president. so when ronald reagan was elected in november 1966, j. edgar hoover and other fbi officials do this as a breath of fresh it. they believe they finally had an out in the governor's mansion, and begin to work closely with ronald reagan to crackdown on student protesters and radical professors. >> so what happened? >> well, what the documents show that over the following years, well, what happened first is that one of the first things reagan does after he is elected is to phone the fbi request this briefing, which hoover personally authorizes. two wks later at fst board of regents meeting, attended by ronald reagan, the board of regents votes to fire clark kerr. the boards balance in power had shifted because reagan was nine-member and he made several appointments to it. one of the fbi documents that was released indicates that the board members were aware of certain fbi information that ronald reagan had at the time. and in the following months and years, the documents show that the fbi continu
like to add that you are listening to the commonwealth of california radio program. chris anderson is discussing a new vision for manufacturing which brings the technology to the desktop. one thing i like about your business as this is a personal aspect that you share your story in. her number when i was a kid, i spent my summers in los angeles with my grandfather. thirty years earlier, i had certainly forgotten about it. and it all flashed back to me. and i realized that it had been in my blood all along. my grandfather was a swiss immigrant to los angeles in the 1920s and he worked in hollywood in mechanical business. at home he was an inventor and he did exactly they were fortunate to have these green lawns. with very elaborate sprinkler systems. they had to turn them off manually. you realize that realized that we needed to put a timer on this survey would be automatic. so he invented the automatic scraper system. so if you have my grandfather did that long ago and that is what he did. we got a box that said it was a kid to make a box powered engine. and i thought, okay, i have
and buy the media? if you change california, blue, broken, broken, sacramento is broken. vote against every single tax, every single one. [applause] please vote against measures. >> i don't think the crowd needs to be reminded of that. [laughter] ann, the ballot is long. >> right. >> there's ten taxes there. vote against every single one. >> right. >> the last thing sacramento needs it more money. it's like giving heroin to a junky. >> i think you may need to go bankrupt. >> how do you buy media, but -- >> i'd also like to comment on your taking over the public schools and actually producing useful ones. liberals don't favor that, but liberals move heaven and earth to send their kids to private schools. that doesn't matter to them what happens in the public schools, and who is it fighting the vouchers tooth and nail. al gore was asked in a debate in harlem when he was running for president because he had been, you know, of course, the democrats that are beholding to the teachers' unions, and so a black gal reporter got up and said, now, you know, if you're big on the public schools, s
started. and both smith and roosevelt lost the california primary to house speaker john garner and the only reason garner one that is because william randolph hearst the great isolationist had thrown his weight behind barn are's campaign. what that meant his when the democrats made a convention in>÷ chicago, franklin roosevelt was living in as the front runner h- had zero overwhelmingly a large number of votes but in those days the democrats were required a two-thirds margin to be nominated so he was about 100 votes short. there were five or so top leading opponents one of whomñ?? was the governor of maryland who i am not related to and another one was newton baker who was the former secretary of war in the wilson administration and al smith and william mcadoo and several others. if those five had been willing to coalesce behind any, but there is a good chance they could have stopped roosevelt. if al smith had been willing to endorse anybody other than himself, that personally would have gotten the nomination but as they discovered you can't beat somebody with nobody. it wasn
of california is adjourned. [applause] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. tweet us, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books on c-span2. >> the same course we have been on will not lead to a better destination. the same path we're on means $20 trillion of debt. means tripling unemployment stagnant take home pay. depressed home values, devastated military, and unless we change course we may be looking at another recession. so, the question of this election comes down to this. do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> we know what change looks like, and what governor romney: is selling ain't it. giving more power the biggest banks isn't change. another $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy is not change. refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies until after the election, definitely not change. >> changing the facts when they're inconvenient to your campaign, not change. >> tuesday night, watch live election coverage on c-span2 with president obama from chicago, and mitt romney in boston, plus key
. why did he move to california? what were his parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so father was the son of irish immigrant and he had traveled around as an itinerant without a lot of different things. he was kind of talk to her about the adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child, ended up staying and eventually married a man named vendor. they moved up to test your mother said it was? i think north dakota and he was killed in a flood of fire. actually, i chide very hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother sirs has been. from that marriage, she did have two children and then she married will ryan and the move to nevada. they make to several dilettantes in nevada and he was a minor. but she has lost one has been to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
in california. that the particular time. there's a whole set of circumstance that lead her to, you know, she's from the tropics, central america, you know, how did she wind up in the desert. everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said, [inaudible] we'll take care of you and give you a place to live shortly there after. i arrive and one of the first things i saw when i rented my shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services 100 miles, the town of 129 presiden. i felt myself to go further out. they are at the edge of beautiful national park. you know that? right. if you haven't been there. u2 album. the joshua tree. you know what it looks like. crazy arms going this way and that. well, i wanted to go further out. there was something that was driving me further out in to the nothing. the big empty, as they say. and also because the further out you went the rent got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. i was paying $27 5 a month for a two-bed rom house with five acres of land on the edge of 29 palms, right where the sign said next service 100 miles. that's where the b
mountains and west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california. because california, as you know, was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. own by the entire nation inspect 1857, the dread scott decision. the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast csh no matter the supreme court republicans would allow slaves in any territory. lincoln was elected in november of 1860, a month later the united states congress came in to session, members of congress put forth various comprises, a critical portion of all in some deal with the division of the territory. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line west ward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. i'm going get to my main topic. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise, which meant the territories. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know his name. abraham linco
to the commonwealth club of california radio program. our guest, wired editor and author chris anderson is discussing a new vision for entrepreneurship that brings manufacturing to the desktop. i thought we would switchgears. one thing i like about your book is it is not just a business phenomenon but a personal aspect to it, you share your story of making things with your daughter's, maybe you could share a little about that. >> after i got into this, i am going to need -- i have a tiny desk and started to pile really high and my wife was getting annoyed, a workshop. it is time. so we built one and it is like oh wait, this is coming back to me. i remember when i was a kid i spent my summers and los angeles with my grandfather and this is 30 years earlier and i hadn't -- i had forgotten about it. it all flashed back to me and i realized it had been in my blood all along, my grandfather was a swiss immigrant and los angeles in the 1920s working in hollywood in the mechanical business. was all gears but at home he was an inventor. he did exactly what a swiss engineer who is a watchmaker would invent in
settlement to take place in 1861. .. because california as you know is already a state. the question is critical because they tend to deal with of the slavery and southern power indonesian. some have demanded what they saw as the constitutional rights of american citizens to take their property in quoting the slave property into the territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857 in the infamous dr. scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional chief. republicans in contrast said never if. fifth republicans would allow in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later in the united states congress can intercession. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the division of territory. most often there was a proposal to extend a dividing line west of the beyond louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this process i'm going to get to my main topic why lincoln rejected the compromise which meant the territories. but their must be one t
to missouri and texas to california. she helped out banks when times were bad and they were in trouble. she was the largest individual lender to the new york city government. she lived in the gilded age when society lived lavishly and she rebelled against their opulence. she lived a simple life. she loved her children and her friends. she was of those who befriended her for her money and she showed her dog great affection and when asked why, she said -- [inaudible] [laughter] she forged a path for women to be able to have careers. she showed that women were the equal of any man. newspapers around the world, they proclaimed her the queen of wall street. it was known throughout that she was the richest woman in america. so there are lots of sayings in the back of the book and words of wisdom. she did have a good sense of humor and she was one smart lady. if you have any questions, i would love to try and answer. >> would you find any evidence of her support? >> nine. she said women should not have the right to vote. margaret thatcher did leave and not either. vera can't even believe in it. it
in the state of california that applies the standards to the california universities. but the private universities are bound by their own the promise. yale and harvard across the country promised freedom of speech in the language and these are enforceable contracts in most states in the union particularly massachusetts and new york by the way that is enforced and promises but it's not just the legal enforceability it is the moral power, and believe me, i know this from experience columbia, harvard, yale do not like being called off when they violate their own promises and the freedom of speech. america has been a little bit more about it and that is why it is good to step up the argument. it is harder. it is a harder road but you are holding them against their own values and people in that university you know they are wrong. but it is the harder fight and definitely to stay in touch with them to help you fight. >> i'm also at the american university. you have mentioned a lot about the cases in the universities that violated the free-speech law. canion and the universities that have mo
won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department and the african-american studies department. and we are acknowledged their generosity for bringing up to this historical room. that everybody would be able to find it. it's like a landmark. the great poets of the road, great of the world. we want to welcome richard hudson, professor to preaching on behalf of this department. he was professor emeritus and a member of the affiliated faculty of the american studies program and interdisciplinary program that was key founder 25 years ago. he came to you see berkeley's english department in 1964 and retired in 2009. although he's continued teaching until this summer. his special interest has been american cultural history, especially from the civil war to world war one. he's now president of the western literature association will host 300 to 400 people in berkeley at the annual conference in october of 2013 and practices good luck with that. [laughter] >> i basically just want to say a word. you happen to be in the jewel room of an edge department. this department has, unlike other
generations. as governor he compete with other states for jobs and subsidies are relatively easy. california -- [laughter] anybody from california? california, illinois, connecticut, thank you. but those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulations and so that's, you know, we are competing. but we do every day is to try and find companies out there that can't compete. i think about simply if you're a business come to think of yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name the time did the research yourself, i think i'll pay more for the project because i know that company is headquartered in a high tax state. or gosh, i know they have more regulations saw pay more for the product because i know cost the company more for more regulations or takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. so if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulation and faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude to our businesses will outcompete everybody and will get more jobs and that's what we're doing every day. in contrast, my biggest competitor is texas. texas has been doing the
was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question right now. -- go ahead, really quickly -- okay. >> i have campaigned all over the state. some people ha
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